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Archive for the ‘Controversies’ Category

The latest episode of Designing Worlds – where we have the second and final part of a discussion of Second Life’s continued viability and the ways in which Linden Lab might attract existing communities to their new platform – is now on the web.

Our great panel of guests is present again – including Jessica Lyon, Project Manager of Firestorm, Jo Yardley, owner of 1920s Berlin, Maxwell Graf, owner of Rustica. JJ Drinkwater, Virtual and real life Librarian and Pathfinder Lester, Community Engagement specialist (and the ex-Pathfinder Linden).

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

We don’t talk about the technical possibilities of the new platform; instead we’ll be focus on what needs to be done to keep Second Life vibrant and alive … and, at the same time, what might persuade the residents of Second Life to make a commitment to a new environment – and some of the answers may be surprising!

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Join us today, Monday 21st July at 2pm SLT at the Designing Worlds studio in Garden of Dreams for the second (and final) part of our discussion about Second Life’s continued viability and the ways in which Linden Lab might attract existing communities to their new platform.

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

Our great panel of guests is present again – including Jessica Lyon, Project Manager of Firestorm, Jo Yardley, owner of 1920s Berlin, Maxwell Graf, owner of Rustica. JJ Drinkwater, Virtual and real life Librarian and Pathfinder Lester, Community Engagement specialist (and the ex-Pathfinder Linden).

We don’t talk about the technical possibilities of the new platform; instead we’ll be focus on what needs to be done to keep Second Life vibrant and alive … and, at the same time, what might persuade the residents of Second Life to make a commitment to a new environment – and some of the answers may be surprising!

Join us at 2pm for an important and fascinating show – make sure that you don’t miss it!

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

Or – if you can’t attend in person – tune in to the web at 2pm SLT on Monday for a showing on Aview TV, on SLartist or on Treet – or catch it later in the week on our shows page on the Treet.tv web site at http://treet.tv/shows/designingworlds, on the Aview TV Designing Worlds channel – or on the Designing Worlds blog.

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The latest episode of Designing Worlds – where we have Part 1 of a discussion of Second Life’s continued viability and the ways in which Linden Lab might attract existing communities to their new platform – is now on the web.

We have a great panel of guests in this first part of the discussion – including Jessica Lyon, Project Manager of Firestorm, Jo Yardley, owner of 1920s Berlin, Maxwell Graf, owner of Rustica. JJ Drinkwater, Virtual and real life Librarian and Pathfinder Lester, Community Engagement specialist (and the ex-Pathfinder Linden).

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

We don’t talk about the technical possibilities of the new platform; instead we’ll be focus on what needs to be done to keep Second Life vibrant and alive … and, at the same time, what might persuade the residents of Second Life to make a commitment to a new environment – and some of the answers may be surprising!

Make sure you catch Part 2 of this show at 2pm today, Monday 21st July!

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That is, of course, if something was intended as a clarification rather than further obfuscation.

I am talking about the new Terms of Service from Linden Lab, of course.

And really, I can say it no better than Inara who has an excellent post on the subject (this comes from one of her comments to the blogpost – but read the blogpost AND the comments if you are interested in learning why not just content creators but machinima makers, artists and writers are so concerned about the changes to the Terms of Service:

A clear, concise explanation of why the terminology used and why the form in which it is presented has been determined as being the most suitable and how it assists the Lab in the execution of their role as the service provider would help. Particularly as for the vast majority of SL’s existence, and allowing for the broader remit of this ToS compared to those pre-August 2013, a more qualified statement with respect to the provisioning of shared rights has in the past always been deemed appropriate by the Lab.

Or in other words – talk to us, dammit!

Not even necessarily with us – I can appreciate how difficult it could be to assemble a representative group of concerned residents for dialogue – every group will be self-selecting, and the loudest voices are not always the most concerned/affected. But what Inara asks for – a clear, concise explanation – would be of immeasurable benefit in helping residents to understand the thinking involved here.

You might also want to take a look at Vaki’s (Agenda Format) legal dissection of the relevant clauses here.

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Join us today, Monday 14th July at 2pm SLT at the Designing Worlds studio in Garden of Dreams for a discussion about Second Life’s continued viability and the ways in which Linden Lab might attract existing communities to their new platform.

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

The Discussion, photographed by Wildstar Beaumont

We have a great panel of guests – including Jessica Lyon, Project Manager of Firestorm, Jo Yardley, owner of 1920s Berlin, Maxwell Graf, owner of Rustica. JJ Drinkwater, Virtual and real life Librarian and Pathfinder Lester, Community Engagement specialist (and the ex-Pathfinder Linden).

We don’t talk about the technical possibilities of the new platform; instead we’ll be focus on what needs to be done to keep Second Life vibrant and alive … and, at the same time, what might persuade the residents of Second Life to make a commitment to a new environment – and some of the answers may be surprising!

Join us at 2pm for an important and fascinating show – make sure that you don’t miss it!

Designing Worlds studio

Designing Worlds studio

Or – if you can’t attend in person – tune in to the web at 2pm SLT on Monday for a showing on Aview TV, on SLartist or on Treet – or catch it later in the week on our shows page on the Treet.tv web site at http://treet.tv/shows/designingworlds, on the Aview TV Designing Worlds channel – or on the Designing Worlds blog.

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Join us this Wednesday, July 2nd at 1pm SLT, for a special recording in the Designing Worlds studio in Garden of Dreams for a discussion about Second Life’s continued viability and the ways in which Linden Lab might attract existing communities to their new platform.

Designing Worlds studio

Designing Worlds studio

We have a great panel of guests who will be live in the studio with us – including Jessica Lyon, Project Manager of Firestorm (who will be fresh from her own earlier Question and Answer session with Oz and Peter Linden), Jo Yardley, owner of 1920s Berlin, Maxwell Graf, owner of Rustica. JJ Drinkwater, Virtual and real life Librarian and Pathfinder Lester, Community Engagement specialist (and the ex-Pathfinder Linden).

We won’t be talking about the technical possibilities of the new platform; instead we’ll be focussing on what needs to be donne to keep Second Life vibrant and alive … and, at the same time, what might persuade the residents of Second Life to make a commitment to a new environment – and some of the answers may be surprising!

But you will also have the opportunity to having your thoughts and ideas discussed by the panel, either by coming along and joining the live audience, or by posting your thoughts and ideas in comments on this post.

This show will be recorded and shown again on July 14th.

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Linden Homes - little boxes ... on the hillside

Linden Homes – little boxes … on the hillside – nicely built, but no community

There has been some recent talk about the problems with the new user experience (clue – it’s not good) and the dire state of new user retention. A recent video by Skyspinner Soulstar goes some way to explaining why …

The issue is being discussed on Hamlet’s New World Notes – and Carl Metropolitan has offered some very sensible advice and suggestions in the comments – well worth reading.  He’s expanded more on this on his own blog.

The discussion has crystallised for me some thoughts I’ve had for a long while – back to a time when a group of us, including Cain Maven and pitsch Parx discussed doing something to revitalise the Linden Homes experience. And this could be adapted to fit new user retention too.

I think Cloud Party had a good idea in creating tutorials that had you learning the basics – Move, Communicate, Build – and then rewarded you with a house. The houses were a little dull though, and not geared to foster any sense of community, which I thought a weakness.

A Home in Cloudy Party - photograph by Wildstar Beaumont

A Home in Cloud Party – photograph by Wildstar Beaumont

It’s a weakness of the Linden Homes too, which are actually rather nice, well constructed little homes, and cunningly built to use the maximum space available (planting the Master Prim on Government owned land means that residents can spend the full 117 prims on decoration). But they lack any sense of community.  They are just … little boxes, on the hillside … and, too often, they all look just the same. It’s a great idea … but one feels the love ran out.  There was an attempt to create community centres and the Elderglen one is actually quite fun (you can forge metal and catch fairies) … but the Meadowbrook info hub looks like a half-hearted attempt at a country club that ran out of money …

It was this problem that a group of us discussed a few years back … and it does tie in with the new user retention.

Meadowbrook, a bleak unfinished country club

Meadowbrook, a bleak unfinished country club

I liked the idea that newcomers who went through the community gateway process at Caledon Oxbridge could then rent a place in the student dorm for a month – it helped them nest AND gave them a foothold in a lively community. That was in the days when Caledon Oxbridge was a full sim – with a community gateway.  When the community gateway programme was abruptly closed (18 hours notice from the Lab, after many of those involved had invested THOUSANDS of US dollars … that was not a happy time) Oxbridge became a homestead, focusing on education.

Inside Elderglen, a more engaging Linden Home infohub

Inside Elderglen, a more engaging Linden Home infohub

So … this is my idea.

That like Cloud Party, there’s a task/quest/tutorial route, designed by Carl and his team (or someone like him – if that is possible!). On completion of this task – whereby you have learned to walk/talk/manipulate objects – and anything else felt to be core, you are given the choice of a house/apartment for thirty days – in a choice of community styles. NOT a soulless box on a hillside, but one of a number of community choices.

Here are just a few suggestions …

A Irish fishing village, with houses grouped around the harbour, and rising up the hill behind. Everyone gets a sea view … and there’s a pub on the quay (selling only non-alcoloic drinks – but with Irish music on the stream, maybe).

Greater Ireland: Limerick - photograph by PJ Trenton

Greater Ireland: Limerick (now gone) – photograph by PJ Trenton

A set of streets with New York brownstones, two or three storeys high. Somewhere on the block, or a couple of streets over, there is a very cool coffee shop.

A lake in the Himalayas with houseboats, with a sim surround that depicts the snowy mountains.

A fairytale medieval village.

A forest with tree houses.

A futuristic city with apartments.

Whatever the type of build/community the new resident chose, they would find it came partially and simply furnished, to match the style of the community they had chosen – but still with enough free prims to allow a little creativity.

The Brownstones in Nova Albion - apartments, cafe and arts

The Brownstones in Nova Albion – apartments, cafe and arts

Each location would come with several public buildings.

  1. A community gathering place where people could hang out or party.
  2. A performance space, possibly part of the community gathering place, or separate.
  3. A gallery that could display original Second Life Art – with links to other art venues, such as the LEA.
  4. A small number of stores offering freebies or dollarbies (with links to main stores).

Each location – or group of locations – would also have a community warden.  This person would be a volunteer, but would get a special house, rent free, in return for their efforts. They would be responsible for making sure that the art galleries were properly maintained, that streams were available for performances … and generally oiling the wheels that keep the community functioning.

And I mean functioning. New residents would have the chance to participate, not just to watch. There could be building competitions, show and tell sessions, chances to organise visits to interesting places, game nights – things that the community residents might develop for themselves, with the support of the Warden.

Part of the houseboat community in Junkyard Blues

Part of the houseboat community in Junkyard Blues

So what would happen at the end of the thirty days? Well, some of the new residents would not have come back anyway. But for those who have – there would be choices. They could convert to a premium membership and keep their home as their Linden Home. They could stay a base rate member and start to pay rent at a commercial rate. Or they could move out and move on.

But the idea would be that these communities would be so successful that people would want to stay.  And more than that – premium members could choose to move there as well, using these new communities for their Linden Home. The idea, over time, would be to create communities that interacted, and also welcomed newcomers.

Should they all be mainland, like the Linden Homes? Possibly – although there might be grounds for partnerships here eventually with land barons. After all, they have experience in running communities.

Elegant (and low prim) Regency Homes in London, Knightsbridge

Elegant (and low prim) Regency Homes in London, Knightsbridge

Carl has offered his assistance in developing the community experience … I can offer my rolodex for contacting the designers who would LOVE to be a part of creating regions like this (and probably my cat-herding skills too).

 

 

 

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Join us at 2pm SLT today, Monday 18th November, for Designing Worlds at our studio in Garden of Dreams for Part 2 of our special show as we discuss an issue of key importance to many designers on the grid – the changes made to Linden Lab’s Terms of Service for Second Life.

Designing Worlds Terms of Service show Part 2

Designing Worlds Terms of Service show Part 2

In Part 1 (available here on Aview TV), a group of concerned residents explored the problems that are caused by the changes for different communities and in the second half of the show, we showed a presentation by Agenda Faromet of the Second Life Bar Association, who compares different Terms of Service before looking in detail at the Lab changs. What she has to say may surprise you!

In Part 2, to discuss questions that have arisen from the issue – and question asked by our live audience – we are joined once more by we are joined by Jilly Kidd, of the writer’s group Written Word, Chic Aeon, artist, machinimatographer, builder (past tense), blogger, store owner and curator of LEA7 – the Machinima Open Studio Project; Cain Maven, designer and owner of Maven Homes and Quantum Luxury Homes; Kylie Skyborne, Council Facilitator and Press for UCCSL & Curator for the Rose Theatre Galleries; and Jamie Bryce Infinity, a technology lawyer who started on Wall Street and now is the general counsel of an internet standards organization – in Second Life, he has served on the SL Bar Association board of directors, and has been involved in a number of virtual world intellectual property and privacy disputes.

Designing Worlds Terms of Service show Part 2

Designing Worlds Terms of Service show Part 2

It all makes for a fascinating and timely show – so do come and watch it at 2pm!

Or – if you can’t attend in person – tune in to the web at 2pm SLT on Monday for a special showing on Aview TV – or catch it later in the week on our shows page on the Treet.tv web site at http://treet.tv/shows/designingworlds – or on the Designing Worlds blog – our very own version of the iPlayer!

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There have been several charges levelled against the One Billion Rising in Second Life. One was that it was invalidated by its refusal to address the issue of violence against men.  Or indeed, the issue of all violence everywhere.  So often was this repeated that in the end I actually wrote a post about it – which you can read here.

A second charge that was made against the event (in Second Life and in the real world) was that it was in some way invalidated by the fact that it was organised and attended by middle class women.  Several commentators made this point – including one who, in addition to stigmatising the protest as “middle class” felt the need to stress that they had working class parents.

Middle class women in Mayfair?

Middle class women in Mayfair?

Here I want to stress my perspective as a Brit so there shouldn’t be mis-interpretation.  For me, “middle class” is a term that refers to white collar, professional workers. It covers a wide range of trades and professions – ranging from company directors to shopkeepers, from university professors to office workers at management level.  It’s the widest class in the UK – the upper classes are a smaller part of the system, generally being seen as people who have inherited land and/or titles.  A company director, no matter how wealthy, would not be seen as part of this class – although he or she could marry into it.  The situation might be different in the US.

In the UK, the working class would be seen as people who work primarily in junior positions, manually (or jobs where manual labour is a core component).  It would also largely include the non-working population who are claiming state benefits – although some of those might generally be seen as unemployed middle class.  Again, this might be different in the US.

The middle class is the largest class in the UK at present.  In previous times, the working class has been larger proportionately; one of Margaret Thatcher’s ambitions was to ensure that as many people as possible should identify themselves as middle class, and therefore aimed at raising living standards and matching aspirations, with the intention that the new middle classes, their aspirations to – for example – own their own home, should then vote for her party, the Conservative Party. For about a decade, this strategy was highly successful.

Ironically, despite the fact that so many people aspire to join the middle class or would classify themselves as middle class, the name itself is frequently denigrated or used pejoratively – as it has been in discussions of One Billion Rising.

And I believe this is wrong in this context – for four reasons.

1) This event wasn’t just for middle class Westerners
Of the many, many exciting aspects of this event, one of the most exciting was its global nature. The Guardian newspaper live-blogged it, and reported what happened in the UK, the Democratic Republic of Congo, across the US, in Egypt, Ethiopia, Australia, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, India, Mexico, Philippines, Singapore, Germany, Albania, the Netherlands, Somalia, Israel, Hong Kong, Nepal, Iceland, Turkey, the Maldives, Italy, Poland, Indonesia and … oh yes, they featured an event in Second Life too.

This was not just middle class women – although middle class women were involved.  In Albania, for example, one arena featured a centre for Roma women – one of the most disadvantaged communities in Europe.  In some countries, where dancing is seen as shocking, women marched or watched films, or talked.  In some countries where dancing is frowned upon, women danced in their own spaces – Virtual Evangelical referred to having seen it on a Saudi Arabian blog. In Bangladesh, at least 1,000 acid attack survivors were planning to take  part in rallies across the country.

It goes without saying that there are middle and even upper class women taking part in all these events.  But they are reaching wider. Women of all classes are joining in, from the Queen of Bhutan to Indian street vendors.

Someone made the point on a blog that it would probably be more useful if women spent a week reading the newspapers than dancing.  But that presupposes a free press. It presupposes that women have access to newspapers, and the means to purchase them and that – once they do have them – they know how to read. The idea of dancing was chosen, in part, because it is a simple, low cost activity that is easily understood.

2) Violence against women affects middle class women too
This really should go without saying, but the abuse that women face crosses class boundaries. Middle class women are beaten up and raped too.

3) You shouldn’t limit protests to the people affected
This is actually a more general point – because, as I said above, middle class women ARE affected by the issue.  But even if they weren’t, even if no single middle class woman was sexually or physically abused, I believe passionately that it would still be right for middle class women to protest in support of their sisters – just as we welcomed men into One Billion Rising.

Because, if you impose that limitation, you are saying that unless you have experience female genital mutilation, you can’t protest on behalf of your sisters.  You are saying that unless you have been through the hell of a forced marriage, or an acid attack, you have no right to stand up and say, “This is wrong. This must stop.”

And if you start to slice and dice in that way, you are left with one terrified girl cowering in the corner of a room … because her experience is unique and, if you have not been through it, you have no right to protest about it.

And that is so very clearly wrong.

Middle class women dancing in the tropics?

Middle class women dancing in the tropics?

4) The middle class – and middle class women particularly – are routinely stigmatised in a attempt to silence them
And other women should not be a part of doing this.

It is an age-old problem that where we should be uniting, women attack other women. They negate what women are doing. They belittle it.  This happens for a variety of reasons, many more complex than the one that is usually cited – that these women want to curry favour with men. I think we do see that, even in an internet age (the appalling attacks on Kathy Sierra involved other women, for example).

But to assume that is the case in every instance is wrong.  There’s a space for valid criticism and a space for valid critiquing, and that is important – indeed, essential.

But the use of stigmatising terms does not foster debate.  It promotes the skewed disparity in language that consistently sees words that reference women acquiring a lower value than words that describe men.

Don’t believe me? Run these pairs through your head and remember, once they were completely matched as a term for a male – a term for a female:
Sir – Madam
Master – Mistress
King – Queen
Bachelor – Spinster
Courtier – Courtesan
In every case, the female pair of the word has either become less of an honorific than the male term, or has acquired a secondary meaning that can be used pejoratively.

In the same way, “middle class” has become a pejorative term, occupying the space once held by “do-gooder”.  It implies people who, through economic stability, are out of touch with the “real world”.  It suggests that these people are patronising and (frequently) domineering, attempting to impose their own world view on others.

And yet …

If one looks at social history, it has frequently been middle class women who have brought about great social change in the world. In times when working class women had little leisure time to give to things such as protests and social change, it was middle class women who were in the vanguard with the male social reformers – from Hannah Moore to Elizabeth Fry to Florence Nightingale to Josephine Butler to Octavia Hill to Elizabeth Garrett Anderson to Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughters. And that’s just Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries, and the best known women.

There were, of course, far many more nameless middle class women involved in campaigns – sometimes as decorous as the slave sugar boycott. led (in Sheffield) by Mary Anne Rawson – but rapidly spreading across the country. Arguably the first political boycott of its time, the refusal of British consumers to be slave-produced sugar played a significant role in the ending of the slave trade in 1833.

Sometimes the campaigns were rather more dangerous.  Josephine Butler had to escape through the window of a hall where she was speaking to avoid an angry mob on at least one occasion. And one thinks too of the bravery of those women who campaigned for Prohibition. Nowadays we might find their campaign wrong-headed, but there’s no doubting the courage of those women who marched into beer halls and fin joints and knelt down and prayed.

The stigmatising of middle class protest has continued into the twentieth century too – it was one of the charges levelled at the women of Greenham Common and their protests against the nuclear weapons sited there, suggesting that their protest was, in effect, a “fashion statement” and that they would, soon enough clear off to their nice warm houses.

Well, the women have gone now, So too have the missiles.

And conditions in prisons, housing, medicine and nursing have all improved. The slave trade is long gone in the UK, women are not licensed and bullied as prostitutes, and women have had the vote for nearly a hundred years.

Thanks, in part, to the efforts of middle class women.

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One Billion Rising happened yesterday.

Around the world, it was a big thing. It felt like a big thing to be part of it. It felt like a big thing in Second Life too, where I had the honour of being one of the people to organise it.

And this morning, when I wake up, is the world a better and bright place? Have we changed hearts and minds, and reached those clear green uplands where we have peace, truth, and justice for all?

Well, no.  But then I didn’t expect to.

Throughout much of my life, I’ve tried to take a stand on issues that I believe in. Sometimes, those issues have had popular support.  Sometimes, those issues seem to have been proved right by history – I must admit to a wry smile on reading the news that the majority of the public, ten years on, now thinks that those of us who marched against the Iraqi War in 2003 were, in fact, right.  Sometimes, protest against an overwhelming majority felt like being part of a small crazed cult who saw something that no-one could – it was crazy of us not to believe, for example, that siting land-launched nuclear missiles on our small island at vast expense was going to make Britain a safer place to live, and only left-wing fanatics and man-hating lesbian feminists could believe otherwise.

Things have changed – the missiles have, to a large extent, gone. But “socialist” and “feminist” are still often used as abuse.

There’s a story – I don’t know how apocryphal – that Chelsea Clinton had always tended to treat her mother’s feminism and her defensiveness about it as something of a joke (“Oh, Mom!”). Until she was out on the campaign trail with her – and saw for herself the level of venom and hostility directed against her mother not for political reasons (although that obviously happened too) but simply because Hilary was a woman.

Since I was a teenager, I’ve defined myself as a feminist.  I’m still a feminist. Not a post feminist.  Not a modern feminist, a lipstick feminist or any of the other labels that are applied in an effort to make feminism sound less threatening.  Just a feminist. I believe passionately in female equality – and for a lot of my life – and, let’s face it, even today in many parts of the world and in many, many societies, that’s still a deeply unpopular and often a dangerous position to hold.

Living in a Western social democratic country, I have it comparatively easy.  But throughout my life, a thing that has made me blazingly angry is that I am the target of sexual abuse simply because of my gender.

To put this in perspective – I have not been raped or beaten.  But I have been flashed at a few times, been aggressively propositioned by kerbcrawlers, been groped, verbally abused, sexually threatened etc etc. A third of women will be raped or beaten. But the overwhelming majority of the remaining two thirds will be subjected to a level of “Eve teasing”, as the appalling Indian phrase has it, that will make us feel shocked, soiled and very often scared – not because of our actions, but because of our gender.

But many men don’t understand this. I was once at a wedding party where a group of us where sitting around a table – me, my husband, a young male friend we’d brought, a single woman, and a mother with her five daughters, all in their late teens, early twenties.  For some reason we got on to the subject of the levels of abuse women faced for being women. My male friend thought that the older women were exaggerating – until every single woman round the table said, “It’s happened to me.”

And our experience can’t even compare to that of women around the world where social and cultural norms mean that for a woman even to uncover her face or step out of the door alone is to become a target for state supported abuse that might take the form of physical beatings or worse.

So do I think that dancing yesterday changed any of this?

Of course I don’t – any more than I think we stopped the Iraq War by marching, or that protests at Greenham Common sent the missiles away.

But what marching against Iraq did do was to change the focus of debate.  For politicians now to claim that a distant country endangers us and we should commit our soldiers to all-out war is far harder. Not for all time, and not for every cause – but (as the Guardian article points out) the terms of debate have been changed.

And those cold night protesting against cruise missile convoys did raise the level of debate too.

Dropping a pebble in a river won’t make a dam. But if enough people drop pebbles over enough time, there will be a dam.

Some people, of course, won’t like pebbles. They will argue the merit of grit, or mud, or concrete. “If we can’t have concrete,” they’ll say, “it’s not worth doing at all.” Some people will say that the river doesn’t need to be controlled – that if people choose to live in the floodplain, well, that’s their lookout.  Leave well alone.  All of these arguments have their merits.

But I will stand here with my pebble. Drop.

Various arguments have been raised about why One Billion Rising was wrong, was not a good event, was pointless.  I want to address some of those points. But, as I don’t want to bore you with a HUGE long screed, I propose to do this as a series of posts.

I want to make a few things clear before I start.

Posts that name people who are not taking part in the debate here, posts that attack individuals, and posts that use abusive terms will be moderated. My blog, my rules.

Other than that, let’s talk.

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