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Posts Tagged ‘business’

There’s good and bad news from people who are looking to raise money for virtual-world related projects through Kickstarter-style projects.

Bobbekins eBook

Firstly, the good news is that the Wall Street Journal has picked up on Tony Dyson and Chantal Harvey’s project, the new range of eBooks for Children, the BobbeKins – which I wrote about here: Supporting BobbekinWorld – a new case use for Second Life.

The article focuses on Tony’s server choice and while it’s a great plug for the product too, it’s a real shame there’s no link to Netdreamer Publications (see? that’s how you do it, WSJ!) or to the Indiegogo initiative to raise funds.  I’m all for built in redundancy, me (as regular readers may have noticed) but hopefully the article will lead to people following through to find out more.

At the time of writing, they have raised $744 of the $15000 they are hoping for, with 48 days left.  You can see more – including a great video – on the Indiegogo page. And here’s wishing them every luck with it!

Another initiative is coming to its end, and, sadly, seems unlikely to raise its funding – a real shame, I think, as it’s an interesting project.  Well, it inspired me to relaunch The Quest for the Golden Prim, and Darren Greene, who is behind it, has been of great help to us in thinking through the technical side.

Splintered Rock

Splintered Rock

He has been raising funds for his own webcomic, Splintered Rock, and using Kickstarter to raise £350 (US$545 approx) to enable him to work on a second chapter, as I wrote about here: Be part of the adventure of Splintered Rock.  So far, it’s raised £170 (Around $264) so, with two days to go, he still needs to raise just over half.

I hope he makes it. I’d love to find out What Happens Next in his story!

At some point, I’m going to look at these kind of projects in some detail, perhaps a Prim Perfect article.  What do people think?  What’s been their experience?

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Centre for Business Development

Centre for Business Development

And here is another Second Life suvey, but not created by Prim Perfect this time!

The Centre For Business Development in Second Life is a collaborative group of business people working together to identify and improve areas that may be hindering growth in Second Life. Their aim is to be proactive in improving business growth, opening avenues of communication with Linden Lab and enriching experiences for SL residents.

As the first part of this initiative they are undertaking a comprehensive survey to gather information that will be useful to use in identifying issues and provide us with a good basis to start developing strategies.

They say: “We all have our own ideas about what is working and not working in SL, but we need your help in gathering facts and information that will help form the basis of our proposals, strategies and resources.”

The survey will be available until Saturday 12 January.  It is short and easy to complete, and allows respondents to remain anonymous.   They are asking international residents to help each other in translating this poll so that it captures all opinions and insight. The Centre For Business Development in Second Life say that the feedback from residents will be invaluable to them and will, in the long term, benefit all residents.

For more information about the Centre For Business Development in Second Life, visit their website: http://businessdevelopmentcentresl.wordpress.com/
We’re planning to publish the results of the survey here on Prim Perfect.

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I’ve now got the results of the poll I set up recently and they are very interesting – and in some ways reassuring for Linden Lab.  But they also highlight what are people’s serious concerns.  I print the full data at the bottom of this post, below my thoughts on this.

Methodology
I had 246 responses, which isn’t bad for a representative selection – the average UK opinion poll is about 1,500 surveyed for 67 million, so we’re doing rather well. However, balanced against that we have to take into consideration that this was a self-selected poll, in that people had to be sufficiently interested in Second Life to be reading this blog or another that recommended the survey – which suggests a relatively high level of engagement.  There’s also the possibility that individuals could have ‘gamed’ the poll by multiple submissions – however, this does not seem to be the case from the pattern of data I received.

Perceptions of the land market in Second Life
We asked a series of questions (1 – 3) about people’s perceptions of the land market, and these were perhaps the most interesting.

When asked what people thought are the major factors causing the decline of private landholding in Second Life (i.e. the 11% drop in the number of private islands identified by Tyce Shepherd), three main factors were identified (and, as people were allowed to select more than one response here, percentages come out totalling more than 100%).  The overwhelming factor identified was the high cost of tier (84%). However, 66% also identified the economic situation in the real world. The third factor identified (41%) was the dominance of the marketplace making holding land less viable.  This is something I’ve discussed on this blog before – and it’s interesting to see that this is a widely held perception.  Interestingly, although only 16% perceived that a cause for decline was a move to other forms of social gaming, some opf the ‘other’ answers indicated a move to other grids as a possible reason for decline.  27% thought a sense that Second Life is outdated could be a reason for the decline but, interestingly, this is not supported by later questions about Linden Lab innovations on the grid.

The question as to what single factor would make people more inclined to buy or rent land in Second Life was the most unambiguous of all.  70% said that lower tier would make them more inclined to buy or rent land. In addition, of the other 30%, a full 29% cited lowered tier as a significant factor in inclining them to buy or rent land.

In other words, 99% of respondents said that lower tier was a significant or the most significant factor in inclining them to buy or rent land in Second Life.

I have to admit, that level of unanimity rather startled me.

The other leading factors that people thought would make a significant factor in their decision to buy or rent land were improvements to the grid (47%), greater communication with the Lab (31%), and support for educational or non-profit enterprises (24%). The introduction of new features such as Pathfinding tools seemed to excite little enthusiasm.

Land ownership: Current, past and types of land
One thing that is clear (and perhaps not surprising, given the points made above) is that a high proportion of people responding are land owners/renters. 87% either own, rent or both own and rent currently.  Even that high figure, however, hows a decline from the past where 94% either owned, rented or both owned and rented. That small decline is more interesting when we examine how each category has changed.  In the past, 45% owned and rented land. That figure has now declined to 20%. However, there has been an increase in people who own land from 23% to 32%, while the rental market has shown a similar increase from 26% to 35%.

When it comes to types of land held, the highest proportion was parcels on private estates (42%), followed by owned parcels on mainland (33% – which would, of course, include the free land or Linden home that comes with premium membership). Larger land parcels seemed less popular – only 19% owned or rented a homestead; 23% owned or rented a full region (which would include commercial regions that house stores) and 14% owned or rented more than one full region. This question allowed people to specify all their types of land, so the percentages can to more than 100% – I myself have a Linden Home and rent several parcels on private estates, for example.

Land owning intentions: the future
The question about land holdings for those with larger holdings is slightly problematic.  Question 9 was, in fact, aimed at land barons and others who own or rent more than one region. Although only 25 people had indicated this type of land holding in Question 8, a total of 136 answered the question.  This may well be held to invalidate this question.  However, its findings were in line with other questions about land holding intentions: 31% expected to be holding about the same amount of land; 19% expected their holdings to be smaller and only 4% expected them to be larger.  This is a pattern of muted stability tending towards slow decline – it’s what Tyce Shepherd’s figures have been suggesting.

Looking at people’s expectations overall, in Question 7, the trend still seems to be stability – with 35% expecting to hold their current land by the end of 2013.  However, there is a sizeable body of people who expect to have less land or no land – 22%.  In addition, a full 30% are not sure (with 17% of those expecting to still hold some land – although not necessarily their current holdings). Only 6% expect to probably hold more land.  This again reflects the pattern of what I’m calling muted stability, tending towards slow decline.

Future intentions of patterns of land ownership are also interesting.  A full 57% either have no intention or are not sure about buying or renting in the next year. Of those that do intend to acquire land, the largest number (24%) intend to rent – which suggests that there is still potential for a land market.

Here are the full figures. Feel free to add your own thoughts and comments.

 


 

1) What do you think are the major factors causing the decline of private landholding in Second Life?
People could select more than one checkbox on this question, so percentages add up to more than 100%.

Chart 1

Chart 1

The economic situation in the real world 162 66%
A sense that Second Life is outdated 67 27%
A move to other forms of social gaming – e.g. Facebook, phone apps 40 16%
The high cost of tier in Second Life 206 84%
The dominance of the Marketplace making holding land less viable 99 41%
Other 51 21%

 

2) What single factor would make you more inclined to buy or rent land in Second Life?

Chart 2

Chart 2

Lower tier 173 70%
New features (such as the Pathfinding tools) introduced by the Lab 1 0%
Improvements to the existing grid (e.g. lag; group chat) 14 6%
Greater communication with the Lab 6 2%
Support for commercial enterprises 4 2%
Support for educational or non-profit enterprises 19 8%
Support for game creators and managers within Second Life 4 2%
Other 25 10%

 

3) In addition to your previous answer, what OTHER factors would make you more inclined to buy or rent land in Second Life?
People could select more than one checkbox on this question, so percentages add up to more than 100%.

Chart 3

Chart 3

Lower tier 66 29%
New features (such as the Pathfinding tools) introduced by the Lab 30 13%
Improvements to the existing grid (e.g. lag; group chat) 106 47%
Greater communication with the Lab 71 31%
Support for commercial enterprises 30 13%
Support for educational or non-profit enterprises 54 24%
Support for game creators and managers within Second Life 30 13%
Other 22 10%

 

4) Do you currently own or rent land in Second Life?

Chart 4

Chart 4

Own 78 32%
Rent 87 35%
Own and rent 48 20%
Neither 25 10%

 

5) Have you owned or rented in the past?

Chart 5

Chart 5

Own 56 23%
Rent 63 26%
Own and rent 111 45%
Neither 4 2%

 

6) Do you plan to buy or rent land in the next year?

Chart 6

Chart 6

Buy 11 4%
Rent 60 24%
Buy and rent 14 6%
Buy OR rent 11 4%
Not Sure 64 26%
No 77 31%

 

7) If you buy or rent land, do you expect to still hold land (not necessarily your current land) at the end of 2013?

Chart 7

Chart 7

Still hold current land 86 35%
Probably have more land 15 6%
Probably have less land 31 13%
Not sure – but will still have some land 42 17%
Not sure 33 13%
I probably won’t have land by the end of this year 9 4%
I definitely won’t have land by the end of this year 12 5%

 

8) If you have land, what sort of land do you have?
People could select more than one checkbox on this question, so percentages add up to more than 100%.

Chart 8

Chart 8

Mainland (owned) 62 33%
Mainland (rented from a landlord) 10 5%
Homestead – owned 12 6%
Homestead – rented 25 13%
Parcel on a private estate 79 42%
Full region – rented 17 9%
Full regiuon – owned 26 14%
More than one region – rented 3 2%
More than one region – owned 22 12%

 

9) If you own or rent more than one region, do you expect your landholdings to be larger or smaller by the end of 2013?

Chart 9

Chart 9

Larger 10 4%
Smaller 46 19%
About the same 76 31%

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I started a survey on people’s land occupancy in Second Life December 10th, and have been very pleased by the response.  I’ll be closing it at midnight tomorrow, 22nd December, and the results will be published over the Christmas break. So … if you haven’t shared your views, now is your last chance!

Please add your thoughts in the comments too!

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Greater Ireland: Limerick - now gone

Greater Ireland: Limerick – now gone

Daniel Voyager has reported today that the total net loss in private estates in Second Life since January 1st this year is now 2689, a decline of 11.3%. The total number of Main Second Life Grid regions is now 28254 ( 21168 private estates & 7086 Linden owned). The figures come from Tyche Shepherd who posts a weekly update about regions counts in Second Life during the past week on SLUniverse Forums.  Tyche adds that “it’s lower than the bottom of the post openspace repricing decline where we saw a bottom figure of 21195 private estates on 5th April 2009.”  It is, in fact, the lowest figure since July 2008. And it shows no sign of reversing – it’s a steady decline.

But what does this mean for you, and how does it affect your Second Life? What are your perceptions and experience? Please complete this survey – results are anonymous. But if you think there are important questions we are not asking, let us know!

Please add your thoughts in the comments too!

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SL9B logo

SL9B logo

Prim Perfect are planning to stage a series of Meet the Designer events (with panels of home and garden designers) at SL9B.  At the moment, although some have been arranged, we’re looking for more designers to take part in the talks!

This will give an opportunity for designers to meet the public. They can present their newest products, or answer questions about their work and plans – in either speech or text.Prim Perfect logo

Sessions will happen at 2pm from Monday 18th – Sunday 25th June. Wednesday and Thursday are already taken.

Fill in the form here by by June 12th with the following information:

  • Name:
  • Store name:
  • Preferred format; (Interview / Presentation (with or without audience questions) / Question and Answer session)
  • Voice or Text
  • Date/s preferred

You will have fifty prims for display purposes and the use of a slide projector.  We strongly recommend NOT attempting to rezz anything during the session as lag will cause problems.

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Today, Tuesday 15th May, we shall be recording a special edition of Designing Worlds at our studio in Garden of Dreams.

The show will be broadcast on May 28th, but you can watch the taping, and participate by putting questions to our guests.

The theme of the show is looking at two Second Life businesses which – in different ways – are planning to transition into the real world.

The White Armory

The White Armory

The first of these is The White Armory – a well known store that specialises in medieval weaponry and beautiful costumes created by Colton Drechster and Bee Dumpling respectively.

The second is Jazzpaws, the initiative by Zayn Till and Wynx Whiplash of the tinies of Raglanshire, whose recent Kickstarter project garnered a great amount of interest across the grid.

Art Trail in Raglanshire, home of the Tinies

Art Trail in Raglanshire, home of the Tinies

We’ll be discussing these projects, and talking with Maria Korolov of Hypergrid Business about this new style of business transfer and the use of Kickstarter (and similar) funding. And you will have a chance to join the discussion and put your questions to our guests.

Filming will start at around 1.30pm, but you should arrive by 1pm to make sure of a seat.

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